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Thomas Brooks' Quotations

Love of Christ, and the world

posted 10 Dec 2013, 09:58 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 10 Dec 2013, 09:58 ]

The two poles could sooner meet, than the love of Christ and the love of the world.



Sin and grace are to live together

posted 10 Dec 2013, 09:18 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 10 Dec 2013, 09:20 ]

'My sin is ever before me' [Psalm 51.3]. A humble soul sees that he can stay no more from sin, than the heart can from panting, and the pulse from beating. He sees his heart and life to be fuller of sin, than the firmament is of stars; and this keeps him low. He sees that sin is so bred in the bone, that till his bones, as Joseph's, be carried out of the Egypt of this world, it will not out. Though sin and grace were never born together, and though they shall not die together, yet while the believer lives, these two must live together; and this keeps him humble.

Brooks, T. (1866). The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks. (A. B. Grosart, Ed.) (Vol. 3, p. 28). Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert.

No such way to be freed

posted 10 Dec 2013, 09:14 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 10 Dec 2013, 09:14 ]

The only way to avoid cannon-shot is to fall down. No such way to be freed from temptation as to keep low.


Brooks, T. (1866). The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks. (A. B. Grosart, Ed.) (Vol. 3, p. 36). Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert.

Prayer is the gate of heaven

posted 10 Dec 2013, 09:06 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 10 Dec 2013, 09:07 ]

The best and sweetest flowers of Paradise God gives to his people when they are upon their knees. Prayer is the gate of heaven, a key to let us in to Paradise.

Brooks, T. (1866). The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks. (A. B. Grosart, Ed.) (Vol. 2, p. 164). Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert. 

They, who will prove to be the choicest, sweetest, wisest, and strongest Christian!

posted 9 Dec 2013, 23:36 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 10 Dec 2013, 08:57 ]

Remember that it is not hasty reading--but serious meditation on holy and heavenly truths, which makes them prove sweet and profitable to the soul.

It is not the mere touching of the flower by the bee which gathers honey--but her abiding for a time on the flower which draws out the sweet.

It is not he who reads most, but he who meditates most--who will prove to be the choicest, sweetest, wisest, and strongest Christian!

Brooks, T. (1866). The Complete Works of Thomas Brooks. (A. B. Grosart, Ed.) (Vol. 1, p. 8). Edinburgh; London; Dublin: James Nichol; James Nisbet and Co.; G. Herbert.

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