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  29 May 2016, 15:39 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 15:23 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 15:23 Stephen OldPaths
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Thomas Adams (1583–1653) was an English clergyman and reputed preacher. He was called "The Shakespeare of the Puritans" by Robert Southey; while he was a Calvinist in theology, he is not, however, accurately described as a Puritan.  29 May 2016, 15:51 Stephen OldPaths
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Joseph Alleine (baptised 8 April 1634 – 17 November 1668) was an English Nonconformist pastor and author of many religious works.  29 May 2016, 15:51 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 15:43 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 15:44 Stephen OldPaths
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Richard Alleine (1610/11 – 22 December 1681) was an English Puritan divine.  29 May 2016, 15:53 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 15:44 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 15:45 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 15:54 Stephen OldPaths
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Sir Robert Anderson, KCB (29 May 1841 – 15 November 1918), was the second Assistant Commissioner (Crime) of the London Metropolitan Police, from 1888 to 1901. He was also an intelligence officer, theologian and writer.  29 May 2016, 15:56 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 15:54 Stephen OldPaths
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John Arrowsmith (29 March 1602 – 15 February 1659) was an English theologian and academic.  29 May 2016, 15:57 Stephen OldPaths
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Albert Barnes (December 1, 1798 – December 24, 1870) was an American theologian, born in Rome, New York. He graduated from Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, in 1820, and from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1823. Barnes was ordained as a Presbyterian minister by the presbytery of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, in 1825, and was the pastor successively of the Presbyterian Church in Morristown, New Jersey (1825–1830), and of the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia (1830–1868).  29 May 2016, 16:00 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:00 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:01 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:01 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:01 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:01 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:01 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:01 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:03 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:07 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:08 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:08 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:08 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:08 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:09 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:12 Stephen OldPaths
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Richard Baxter (12 November 1615 – 8 December 1691) was an English Puritan church leader, poet, hymn-writer,[1] theologian, and controversialist. Dean Stanley called him "the chief of English Protestant Schoolmen". After some false starts, he made his reputation by his ministry at Kidderminster, and at around the same time began a long and prolific career as theological writer. After the Restoration he refused preferment, while retaining a non-separatist Presbyterian approach, and became one of the most influential leaders of the Nonconformists, spending time in prison. His views on justification and sanctification are highly controversial within the Reformed tradition because his teachings seem, to some, to undermine salvation by faith alone, the bedrock of the Protestant Reformation.   29 May 2016, 16:18 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:18 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:14 Stephen OldPaths
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  29 May 2016, 16:14 Stephen OldPaths
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