The Works of 
Thomas Manton

The Complete Works of Thomas Manton (22 vols.) contains all of Manton’s writings and treatises, along with nearly one thousand sermons on law and grace, justification and sanctification, faith and works, and other theological topics central to the theology of the Reformation and the spirit of Puritanism. Thomas Manton devoted his life to preaching and teaching, and devoted his sermons to a verse-by-verse exposition of Scripture, uncovering the specific meaning for his listeners. He preached hundreds of sermons on Romans 8, Psalm 119, Ephesians 1, Hebrews 11, the book of 1 John, the prayer of Jesus in John 17, and other sermons from nearly every book of the Bible—often devoting multiple sermons to a single verse of Scripture.

I do not regard him as a writer of striking power and brilliancy, compared to some of his cotemporaries. He never carries you by storm, and excites enthusiasm by passages of profound thought expressed in majestic language, such as you will find frequently in Charnock, and occasionally in Howe. He never rouses your inmost feelings, thrills your conscience, or stirs your heart of hearts, like Baxter. Such rhetoric as this was not Manton's gift, and the reader who expects to find it in his writings will be disappointed.

As a writer, I consider that Manton holds a somewhat peculiar place among the Puritan divines. He has pre-eminently a style of his own, and a style very unlike that of most of his school. I will try to explain what I mean.

Manton's chief excellence as a writer, in my judgment, consists in the ease, perspicuousness, and clearness of his style. He sees his subject clearly, expresses himself clearly, and seldom fails in making you see clearly what he means. He has a happy faculty of simplifying the point he handles. He never worries you with acres of long, ponderous, involved sentences, like Goodwin or Owen. His books, if not striking, are generally easy and pleasant reading, and destitute of anything harsh, cramped, obscure, and requiring a second glance to be understood. For my own part, I find it easier to read fifty pages of Manton's than ten of some of his brethren's; and after reading, I feel that I carry more away.

Manton was a Calvinist in his theology. He held the very doctrine which is so admirably set forth in the seventeenth Article of the Church of England. He held the same views which were held by nine-tenths of the English Reformers, and four-fifths of all the leading divines of the Church of England down to the accession of James I. He maintained and taught personal election, the perseverance of the saints, the absolute necessity of a regeneration evidenced by its fruits, as well as salvation by free grace, justification by faith alone, and the uselessness of ceremonial observances without true and vital religion. As an expositor of Scripture, I regard Manton with unmingled admiration. Here, at any rate, he is 'facile princeps' among the divines of the Puritan school. 
J.C. Ryle

1. A memoir by Rev. Dr. Harris.
2. A Practical Exposition of the Lord's Prayer.
3. On Christ's Temptation and Transfiguration.
4. On Redemption by Christ and His Eternal Existence.

CONTENTS OF VOLUME ONE


Volume 02

1. An Estimate of Manton (by J.C. Ryle).
2. Several Discourses Tending to Promote Peace and Holiness.
3. Twenty Sermons on Important Passages of Scripture.
4. Farewell Sermon. Hebrews 12:1. The last sermon he preached after the Great Ejection in 1662.
5. A Funeral Sermon.
6. The Saint's Triumph over Death.
7. The Blessed Estate of them that Die in the Lord.

CONTENTS OF VOLUME TWO


Volume 03

1. Eighteen Sermons on the Description, Rise, Growth, and Fall of Antichrist.
2. A Practical Exposition upon the Fifty-Third Chapter of Isaiah.

Writings

Volume 04

A Practical Commentary, or an Exposition, with notes, on the Epistle of James.

Writings

Volume 05

1. A Practical Commentary, or an Exposition, with notes, on the Epistle of Jude.
2. Meat out of the Eater. Zechariah 14:9. Preached to the House of Commons June 30, 1647.
3. England's Spiritual Languishing, its Causes and Cure. Revelation 3:2. Preached to the House of Commons June 28, 1648. 
4. Sermons at Morning Exercise:
a. How we may Cure Distractions in Holy Duties. Matthew 15:7-8.
b. How Ought we to Improve our Baptism? Acts 2:38.
c. Man's Impotency to Help himself out of his Misery. Romans 5:6.
d. The Scripture sufficient without Unwritten Traditions. 2 Thessalonians 2:15.5. Preface to Smectymnuus Redivivus.

Writings

Volume 06

This volume contains 52 sermons on Psalm 119:1-46.

Volume 07

Writings

Volume 08

Writings

Volume 09

Volume 10

Writings

Volume 11

Writings

Volume 12

Writings

Volume 13

Writings

Volume 14

Writings

Volume 15

Writings

Volume 16

Writings

Volume 17

Writings

Volume 18

Writings

Volume 19

Writings

Volume 20

Writings

Volume 21

Writings

Volume 22

Writings