Jehovah Tsidkenu - The Lord Our Righteousness

posted 7 Dec 2013, 13:42 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 7 Dec 2013, 13:42 ]

Jehovah Tsidkenu - The Lord Our Righteousness

(The watchword of the Reformers.)

I once was a stranger to grace and to God,
I know not my danger, and felt not my load;
Though friends spoke in rapture of Christ on the tree,
Jehovah Tsidkenu was nothing to me.

I oft read with pleasure, to soothe or engage,
Isaiah’s wild measure and John’s simple page;
But e’en when they pictured the blood–sprinkled tree,
Jehovah Tsidkenu seemed nothing to me.

Like tears from the daughters of Zion that roll,
I wept when the waters went over His soul;
Yet thought not that my sins had nailed to the tree,
Jehovah Tsidkenu—’twas nothing to me.

When free grace awoke me, by light from on high,
Then legal fears shook me, I trembled to die;
No refuge, no safety in self could I see—
Jehovah Tsidkenu my Saviour must be.

My terrors all vanished before the sweet name;
My guilty fears banished, with boldness I came
To drink at the fountain, life–giving and free—
Jehovah Tsidkenu is all things to me.

Jehovah Tsidkenu! my treasure and boast,
Jehovah Tsidkenu! I ne’er can be lost;
In Thee I shall conquer by flood and by field—
My cable, my anchor, my breastplate and shield!

Even treading the valley, the shadow of death,
This “watchword” shall rally my faltering breath;
For while from life’s fever my God sets me free,
Jehovah Tsidkenu my death–song shall be.

November 18, 1834

A Lesson for All from Newtown.

posted 7 Dec 2013, 13:38 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 7 Dec 2013, 13:38 ]

A Lesson for All from Newtown.

A Lesson for All from Newtown
By John Piper | Dec 15, 2012 12:00 am

Murdering a human being is an assault on God. He made us in his own image. Destroying an image usually means you hate the imaged. Murdering God’s human image-bearer is not just murder. It’s treason — treason against the creator of the world. It is a capital crime — and more. “Whoever sheds the blood of man, by man shall his blood be shed, for God made man in his own image” (Genesis 9:6).

As usual, Jesus takes this up in devastating terms. None of us escapes.

You have heard that it was said to those of old, “You shall not murder; and whoever murders will be liable to judgment.” But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, “You fool!” will be liable to the hell of fire. (Matthew 5:21–22)

He does not say unwarranted anger is the same as murder. It’s not. Ask the bereaved parents of Newtown. He says both are liable to hell. Both come under a similar sentence from God. Why would Jesus say that?

Because both are a sin against God, not just man. Jesus’s threat of hell is owing not to the seriousness of murder against man, but to the seriousness of treason against God. In the mind of Jesus — the mind of God — heartfelt verbal invective against God’s image is an assault on the infinite dignity of God, the infinite worth of God. It is, therefore, in Jesus’s mind, worthy of God’s righteous judgment.






So what we saw yesterday in the Newtown murders was a picture of the seriousness of our own corruption. None of us escapes the charge of sinful anger and verbal venom. So we are all under the just sentence of God’s penalty. That is what Jesus was saying in Matthew 5:21–22.

And it is exactly what Jesus said again when people pressed him to talk about the time Pilate slaughtered worshippers in the temple. Instead of focusing on the slain or the slayer, he focused on all of us:

Do you think that these Galileans were worse sinners than all the other Galileans, because they suffered in this way? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish. (Luke 13:2–3)

Which means that the murders of Newtown are a warning to me — and you. Not a warning to see our schools as defenseless, but to see our souls as depraved. To see our need for a Savior. To humble ourselves in repentance for the God-diminishing bitterness of our hearts. To turn to Christ in desperate need, and to treasure his forgiveness, his transforming, and his friendship.

That one main end of the Word of God.

posted 7 Dec 2013, 13:35 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 7 Dec 2013, 13:36 ]

That one main end of the Word of God.

“That one main end of the Word of God,
and preaching,
is to discover this deceitful heart.
It’s to make us know ourselves;
compared therefore to a glass,
that will show a deformed man all his unloveliness,
and this is a glass,
not to the face but the heart;
all those hidden and unknown lusts may there be brought to light.
And the Ministry that is compared to light;
as the sunbeams discover those many thousands of motes in the air,
which the darkness concealed;
thus the Ministry,
in a powerful and soul-saving way dispensed,
will make thee see thyself to be that beast,
that devil,
yea to have that dunghill,
that hell in thy heart,
thou didst not perceive:
look then for this benefit by preaching,
not what may fit thy ear,
may please thy fancy,
but what may discover the dark corners of thy soul,
what may bring glorious light into thy breast;
that thou mayest cry out;
O Lord, how long have I lived and did not know myself!
I thought all was well,
everything was in quiet;
but now I am like the Syrian army,
that being by the Prophet stricken blind,
and thought they were guided to their own camp,
as soon as ever they had their eyes opened,
they found themselves in the midst of the enemy’s camp:
Thus thy eyes being opened,
thou seest thyself to be in the power of all thy sins,
all thy enemies and the curses of God.”

- Anthony Burgess [d. 1664]

Spiritual Refining, Part II: A Treatise of Sin, pp. 19-20

Four truths every Christian should know about Salvation.

posted 7 Dec 2013, 13:33 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 7 Dec 2013, 13:39 ]

Four truths every Christian should know about Salvation.

Hadley, E. C.

Many believers are frustrated and troubled about their walk, sometimes doubting their salvation because of so much failure in their lives. The following four truths about salvation should be helpful to anyone with such thoughts.

Truth 1: Forgiveness

When we come to the Lord Jesus as sinners and accept Him as our Saviour, God forgives our sins and justifies us because of the shed blood of Christ (Romans 3:23-26).

When Jesus was on the cross, our sins were laid on Him and He took the punishment for them. There is no more judgment for sin for all who accept Christ as their Savior. Every sin that comes into our lives has already been judged and punished when Christ died for us on the cross (Isaiah 53:5-6; Hebrews 9:28; 10:12-14).


Perhaps someone might say, "If that is true it does not make much difference whether we continue to sin or not." But it does make a tremendous difference, because there are three other truths to consider about salvation.

Truth 2: A New Nature

When we accept Christ as our Saviour, God not only forgives us and justifies us, but He also gives us a new (divine) nature. We are born again, we become God's children (1 Peter 1:23; James 1:18; 2 Peter 1:4). This new nature loves God and hates sin; it makes us desire to live without sinning and makes us feel miserable when we do sin. No born again Christian can be truly happy in sin.

But someone asks, "Why do I do sinful things if I have a new nature? I really do not want to do them, but even with all my good intentions I eventually give in and do them again."

We not only have a new nature that hates sin, but we also still have the old (sinful) nature that loves sin. There is a conflict going on within us. The old nature wants to sin but the new nature wants to please God.

Besides this, we have consciences which tell us that what the new nature wants is right, and what the old nature wants is always wrong. But we find all too often that the old nature, with its desires and lusts for sinful things, is the strongest in time of temptation. It carries us away captive and we do those things which our new nature hates and our consciences denounce.

After it is all over we regret it and resolve that we will never do it again. However, it just seems as if we don't have any strength to resist temptation. What is to be done? Here is where the third truth of salvation comes in.

Truth 3: The Holy Spirit

When we accepted Christ as our Savior and were born again, God gave us His Holy Spirit to live in our hearts (Ephesians 1:13; Galatians 4:6). This Holy Spirit pours out the love of God in our hearts and causes us to feel the peace of Christ in our souls. As a result, we are happy! (Romans 5:1-15).

But when we give way to sin, the Holy Spirit is grieved. He cannot give us joy, because that would encourage us in those sinful things which He hates. He is one with God the Father and Son in His hatred of sin and love of righteousness and holiness (Ephesians 4:30).

The Holy Spirit is given to us not only to pour out the love of God in our hearts. He also gives us power to say "No!" to the desires of the old nature, and to yield ourselves to the will of God, doing those things that please Him. "Walk in the Spirit, and you shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh" (Galatians 5:16).

It is just like Peter walking on the water. As long as he was counting on the Lord to hold him up, all went well; but the very moment he noticed that the wind and the waves were rough, he became afraid and began to sink. In our Christian experience we must count on the Lord to hold us up each step of the way by the power of His indwelling Spirit (Matthew 14:24-31; John. 15:4, 5).

Truth 4: Fellowship

Salvation brings us into fellowship with God. There is a happy feeling between God as our Father and us as His children. We can enjoy hearing what He has to say to us by His Spirit through His Word. We feel free to talk with Him about all our troubles, just as a child is free with his earthly father whom he knows loves him. He makes us happy by his smile.

However, when a child disobeys, he knows his father will be displeased. Instead of a smile he has to experience discipline. The relationship between father and child has not changed, but the fellowship and the happy feeling between them has been broken.

So it is with our heavenly Father. When we sin we are still His children. It is also true that Christ already took the judgment for that sin; it has been put away by His sacrifice on the cross. But fellowship with our Father and with our Savior is broken and the Holy Spirit is grieved. The Father has to rebuke us for our disobedience and perhaps even chasten us, especially if we continue in it.



If we come to Him with confession, humbled because of our sin and disobedience, then we can experience His forgiveness as a father forgives his child. Fellowship is restored and we feel free and happy in His presence again (1 John 1:9).

So then, when a child of God sins he is not lost, because God has accepted him on the basis of Christ's sacrifice for our sins. Neither is his relationship with God broken. He is still God's child and God is still his Father. But his fellowship with the Father is broken, the Holy Spirit is grieved and he is subject to the Father's chastening. When he is humbled about his sin and confesses it to his Father then fellowship is restored.

There is one thing we lose by sin that can never be restored. Christ said that a cup of cold water given in His name would never be forgotten (Mark 9:41). He is going to give a reward for everything we do to pleasm. Therefore, if instead of giving way to sin we had been obedient and done something that pleased Him, we would have received a reward in heaven.

But now that reward is lost because we have lost the opportunity to gain it. That is an eternal loss, since every reward Christ gives in heaven is an eternal reward.

This should make us careful not to lose the opportunities we have each day for faithfulness to the Lord. If we let them slip by, both the opportunities and the rewards are lost forever.

We will have all eternity to rejoice in the rewards for our victories, but we have only the present moment to win them. There are no victories to be won in heaven — they must all be won now or never.

Truth 4: Fellowship

Salvation brings us into fellowship with God. There is a happy feeling between God as our Father and us as His children. We can enjoy hearing what He has to say to us by His Spirit through His Word. We feel free to talk with Him about all our troubles, just as a child is free with his earthly father whom he knows loves him. He makes us happy by his smile.

However, when a child disobeys, he knows his father will be displeased. Instead of a smile he has to experience discipline. The relationship between father and child has not changed, but the fellowship and the happy feeling between them has been broken.

So it is with our heavenly Father. When we sin we are still His children. It is also true that Christ already took the judgment for that sin; it has been put away by His sacrifice on the cross. But fellowship with our Father and with our Savior is broken and the Holy Spirit is grieved. The Father has to rebuke us for our disobedience and perhaps even chasten us, especially if we continue in it.

If we come to Him with confession, humbled because of our sin and disobedience, then we can experience His forgiveness as a father forgives his child. Fellowship is restored and we feel free and happy in His presence again (1 John 1:9).

So then, when a child of God sins he is not lost, because God has accepted him on the basis of Christ's sacrifice for our sins. Neither is his relationship with God broken. He is still God's child and God is still his Father. But his fellowship with the Father is broken, the Holy Spirit is grieved and he is subject to the Father's chastening. When he is humbled about his sin and confesses it to his Father then fellowship is restored.

There is one thing we lose by sin that can never be restored. Christ said that a cup of cold water given in His name would never be forgotten (Mark 9:41). He is going to give a reward for everything we do to please Him. Therefore, if instead of giving way to sin we had been obedient and done something that pleased Him, we would have received a reward in heaven.

But now that reward is lost because we have lost the opportunity to gain it. That is an eternal loss, since every reward Christ gives in heaven is an eternal reward.

This should make us careful not to lose the opportunities we have each day for faithfulness to the Lord. If we let them slip by, both the opportunities and the rewards are lost forever.

We will have all eternity to rejoice in the rewards for our victories, but we have only the present moment to win them. There are no victories to be won in heaven — they must all be won now or never.

The religions do not teach the same morality.

posted 7 Dec 2013, 13:27 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 7 Dec 2013, 13:28 ]

The religions do not teach the same morality.

For example, Hinduism has a caste system that locks men into a certain status from birth, and the low caste are considered inferior to the high. In places where Hinduism is still followed in its purest forms, such as Nepal and rural India, the caste system is very strong. In Nepal, low castes are not even allowed into the homes of high castes. In many villages, the low castes are not allowed to drink out of the same wells and fountains as the high caste. In parts of India there is even an “unseeable caste” whose members are required to work at night. Though some Hindu scholars claim that the caste system is not an integral part of Hinduism, it has been practiced by Hindus for thousands of years and has support from the Hindu scriptures.

The Bible, on the other hand, teaches that all men are the same “caste.” We came from the same original father and mother, and God commands us to treat all men alike. God’s law as given in the Bible is, “Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself” (Galatians 5:14). If I love my neighbor as myself, I will not treat him as an inferior and try to “keep him down.” The Bible commands men to treat one another with perfect justice. “Ye shall not respect persons in judgment; but ye shall hear the small as well as the great; ye shall not be afraid of the face of man; for the judgment is God's” (Deuteronomy 1:17).


In Hinduism, morality is largely relative. Take lying, for example. Even the Hindu gods themselves lie. Yet the Bible teaches that lying is a great sin. Consider the following commandment:

“Wherefore putting away lying, speak every man truth with his neighbour: for we are members one of another” (Ephesians 4:25).

The Bible says that God hates the lying tongue (Prov. 6:16-17). It says that the liar is a wicked person (Prov. 11:18). It says that Satan is the father of lies and those who tell lies are following in his evil ways (John 8:44). The Bible even says that all liars who die without salvation will be punished in eternal hell.

“But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, AND ALL LIARS, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death” (Revelation 21:8).

Obviously, what Hinduism teaches about lying and what the Bible teaches are different and contradictory. If one is right, the other is wrong.

The religions also do not teach the same thing about salvation.

posted 7 Dec 2013, 13:24 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 7 Dec 2013, 13:25 ]

The religions also do not teach the same thing about salvation. 

All religions except Bible Christianity, teach that salvation is by works. In Hinduism, the goal of salvation is to be released from the cycles of reincarnation (the “wheel of life”), and this is achieved in one of three ways: through working out one’s karma by rituals, giving alms, good deeds, etc., through yogic meditation and “self knowledge,” or through devotion to the Hindu gods by private devotions, temple rituals and pilgrimages. In Islam, salvation is achieved through praying five times a day toward Mecca, celebrating Ramadan, giving alms, going on a pilgrimage to Mecca, etc.

The Bible’s teaching on salvation is entirely different. According to the Bible, salvation is not what man does for God; it is what God has done for man. According to the Bible, man cannot be saved by his “good works,” because he is a sinner and he cannot do the perfect works that God’s holy law requires. God Himself has provided salvation as a gift by coming into the world and dying on the cross to suffer the punishment that men deserve. According to the Bible, there is no reincarnation and no nirvana. There is either heaven or hell. “And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment” (Hebrews 9:27).


The religions also do not teach the same thing about Jesus.

posted 7 Dec 2013, 13:22 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 7 Dec 2013, 13:22 ]

The religions also do not teach the same thing about Jesus.

The Bible says Jesus is the eternal God who created all things. He came into the world 2,000 years ago by the virgin birth. He lived a sinless life, died on the cross for man’s sins, spent three days in the grave, and rose from the dead. He ascended back to heaven and is coming again to rule the world.

The Islamic religion believes in a Jesus named Isa, but he is not God, did not die for man’s sins, and did not rise from the dead. 

Hinduism teaches that Jesus was a great guru who learned religious wisdom and attained to an exalted status, but Hindus do not believe that Jesus is the only God and Creator and the only Saviour from sin. 

Judaism teaches that Jesus was a deceived Jewish rabbi who falsely claimed to be the Messiah and who was crucified for his lies. 

It is obvious that the various major religious do not teach the same thing about Jesus.

Are they the same God?

posted 7 Dec 2013, 13:19 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 7 Dec 2013, 13:20 ]

Are they the same God?

The religions also do not teach the same things about God. 

The Bible teaches that God had no beginning; He is eternal. He made all things, but He is not all things. It teaches that God is not to be worshipped in the form of idols. It says that God is Almighty and omnipotent, that he can do anything, and he is omniscient, meaning he knows all things. The Bible says God knows the names of every star, how many hairs are on man’s head, and the thoughts of every man’s heart. The Bible teaches that God is holy. He never commits any wrong deed, never lies, never cheats, never commits fornication, never steals another man’s wife, never acts foolishly in a rage, never gets high on drugs. The Bible says God is love, that even though men have sinned against him and broken his law and turned to their own way, that God loves them and provided salvation for them by coming into the world and dying on the cross. The Bible says that God is “meek and lowly in heart.” He is not proud. He treats men equally and does not look down on some of them as “peons.”





No other religion believes in a God like this. Consider Hinduism. Krishna, an incarnation of Vishnu, is said to be “God Himself” (Upadhyay, Hindu Gods and Goddesses, p. 51). He is deceitful, disobedient, and lascivious. “As a child Krishna was playful and mischievous. Innocent and obedient in his mother’s presence, he missed no opportunity for mischief when her back was turned. He ... mocked and laughed at his elders and teased little babies until they cried, urinated in neighbours’ houses and stole butter and sweets. But Yasodha and Nanda, who had no control over him, just laughed at his antics. ... As a youth, Krishna enchanted and intoxicated the cowherd women with his flute playing. He teased them and made love to them” (Indian Gods, Kent: Grange Books, 1998, p. 45, 47). Krishna’s flute playing is said to “pull virtuous women from their homes and drag them to Krishna” and to make “chaste ladies forget their lords” (David Kinsley, The Sword and the Flute). 

Since the religions’ teaching about God is different, how can it be possible that they all lead to the same God?

Quotations from Thomas Brooks.

posted 7 Dec 2013, 13:17 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 7 Dec 2013, 13:17 ]

Quotations from Thomas Brooks.
  1. Let those be thy choicest companions who have made Christ their chief companion. 
  2. The lives of ministers oftentimes convince more strongly than their words; their tongues may persuade, but their lives command.
  3. Christ choosing solitude for private prayer, doth not only hint to us the danger of distraction and deviation of thoughts in prayer, but how necessary it is for us to choose the most convenient places we can for private prayer. Our own fickleness and Satan's restlessness call upon us to get into such places where we may freely pour out our soul into the bosom of God [Mark 1.35].
  4. Suffering times are sealing times. The primitive Christians found them so, and the suffering saints in Mary's days found them so. When the furnace is seven times hotter than ordinary, the Spirit of the Lord comes and seals up a man's pardon in his bosom, his peace with God, and his title to heaven. Blessed Bradford looked upon his sufferings as an evidence to him that he was on the right way to heaven.
  5. It is better to have a sore than a seared conscience.
  6. God sees us in secret, therefore, let, us seek his face in secret. Though heaven be God's palace, yet it is not his prison.
  7. God's hearing of our prayers doth not depend upon sanctification, but upon Christ's intercession; not upon what we are in ourselves, but what' we are in the Lord Jesus; both our persons and our prayers are acceptable in the beloved [Eph 1.6].
  8. Christ is the sun, and all the watches of our lives should be set by the dial of his motion.
  9. An idle life and a holy heart is a contradiction.
  10. Repentance is a grace, and must have its daily operation, as well as other graces. A true penitent must go on from faith to faith, from strength to strength; he must never stand still or turn back. True repentance is a continued spring, where the waters of godly sorrow are always flowing. 'My sin is ever before me'.
  11. It was a choice saying of Augustine, 'Every saint is God's temple, and he who carries his temple about him, may go to prayer when he pleaseth'.
  12. Prayer is nothing but the breathing that out before the Lord, that was first breathed into us by the Spirit of the Lord.
  13. Those years, months, weeks, days, and hours, that are not filled up with God, with Christ, with grace, and with duty, will certainly be filled up with vanity and folly. The neglect of one day, of one duty, of one hour, would undo us, if we had not an Advocate with the Father.
  14. You had better be a poor man and a rich Christian, than a rich man and a poor Christian. You had better do anything, bear anything, and be anything rather than be a dwarf in grace.
  15. Much faith will yield unto us here our heaven, but any faith, if true, will yield us heaven hereafter.
  16. A man's most glorious actions will at last be found to be but glorious sins, if he hath made himself, and not the glory of God, the end of those actions.
  17. The two poles could sooner meet, than the love of Christ and the love of the world.
  18. 'My sin is ever before me' [Psalm 51.3]. A humble soul sees that he can stay no more from sin, than the heart can from panting, and the pulse from beating. He sees his heart and life to be fuller of sin, than the firmament is of stars; and this keeps him low. He sees that sin is so bred in the bone, that till his bones, as Joseph's, be carried out of the Egypt of this world, it will not out. Though sin and grace were never born together, and though they shall not die together, yet while the believer lives, these two must live together; and this keeps him humble.
  19. The only way to avoid cannon-shot is to fall down. No such way to be freed from temptation as to keep low.
  20. The best and sweetest flowers of Paradise God gives to his people when they are upon their knees. Prayer is the gate of heaven, a key to let us in to Paradise.

Quotes from the Christian in Complete Armour.

posted 7 Dec 2013, 13:15 by Stephen Chaffer   [ updated 7 Dec 2013, 13:15 ]

Quotes from the Christian in Complete Armour.
by William Gurnall

(collected by Mark Reynolds)
  1. Paul was Nero's prisoner, but Nero was much more God's. (I:9)
  2. No, the Christian must stand fixed to his principles, and not change his habit; but freely show what countryman he is by his holy constancy in the truth. (I:14)
  3. Take heart therefore, O ye saints, and be strong; your cause is good, God himself espouseth your quarrel, who hath appointed you his own Son, General of the field, called 'the Captain of our salvation,' Heb 2:10. (I:16)
  4. Blind zeal is soon put to a shameful retreat, while holy resolution, built on fast principles, lifts up its head like a rock in the midst of the waves. (I:17)
  5. O take heed of this squint eye to our profit, pleasure, honour, or anything beneath Christ and heaven; for they will take away your heart ... that is, our love, and if our love be taken away, there will be little courage left for Christ. (I:18)
  6. We must not confide in the armour of God, but in the God of this armour, because all our weapons are only 'mighty through God,' 2 Cor 10:4 (I:53)
  7. Thus you see it is not armour as armour, but as armour of God, that makes the soul impregnable. (I:54)
  8. I do not bid thee try the truth of thy grace by such a power as is peculiar to stronger grace, but by that power which will distinguish it from false [grace]. (I:57)
  9. Whihle the Christian commits a sin he hates it; whereas the [hypocrite] loves it while he forbears it. (I:57)
  10. If thou beest never so exact in thy morals, and not a worshipper of God, then thou art an atheist. (I:60)
  11. In heaven we shall appear, not in armour, but in robes of glory. But here these are to be worn night and day; we must walk, work, and sleep in them, or else we are not true soldiers of Christ. (I:64)
  12. The longer a soul hath neglected duty, the more ado there is to get it taken up.... (I:65)
  13. Grace is of a stirring nature, and not such a dead thing, like an image, which you may lock up in a chest, and none shall know what God you worship. No, grace will show itself; it will walk with you into all places and companies; it will buy with you, and sell for you; it will have a hand in all your enterprises .... (I:69)
  14. And doth not God deserve the best service thou canst do him in thy generation? (I:70)
  15. Therefore it should be our care, if we would not yield to the sin, not towalk by, or sit at, the door of the occasion. (I:74)
  16. Truth with self-denial [is] a better pennyworth, than error with all its flesh-pleasing. (I:82)
  17. As you love your peace, Christian, be plain-hearted with God and man, and keep the king's highway. (I:83)
  18. The proper seat of sin is the will, of comfort the conscience. (I:85)
  19. It is true, Christian, the debt thou owest to God must be paid in good and lawful money, but, for thy comfort, here Christ is thy paymaster. (I:89)
  20. Love refuseth nothing that love sends. (I:89)
  21. A rent garment is catched by every nail, and the rent made wider. Renew therefore thy repentance speedily, whereby this breach may be made up, and worse prevented... (I:95)
  22. Again, [Satan] will ask the Christian what was the time of his conversion. Art thou a Christian, will he say, and dost thou not know when thou commencedst? Now ... content thyself with this, that thou seest the streams of grace, ....; you may know the sun is up, though you did not observe when it rose. (I:96)
  23. Behold therefore thy God at work, and promise thyself that what he is about, will be an excellent piece. (I:110)
  24. Love cannot think any evil of God, nor endure to hear any speak evil of him, but it must take God's part.... (I:118)
  25. Mercy should make us ashamed, wrath afraid to sin. (I:118)
  26. Few are made better by prosperity, whom afflictions make worse. (I:118)
  27. It is no policy to let thy lusts have arms, which are sure to rise and declare against thee when thine enemy comes. (I:124)
  28. Take heed thou makest not the least child thine enemy by offering wrong to him; God will right the wicked even upon the saint. (I:126)
  29. Thou hast no life to lose, because thou hast given it already to Christ, nor can man take away that without God's leave. (I:127)
  30. Sin disabled man to keep God's law, but it doth not enfranchise or disoblige him that he need not keep it. (I:132)
  31. His subject thou art whom thou crownest in thy heart, and not whom thou flatterest with thy lips. (I:134)
  32. Christ will bear no equal, and Satan no superior; and therefore, hold in with both thou canst not. (I:134)
  33. No, it is some noble enterprise I would have thee think upon, how thou mayst advance the name of Christ higher in thy heart, and [in the] world too, as much as in thee lies. (I:138)
  34. Therefore tremble, O man, at any power thou hast, except thou usest it for God. Art [thou] strong in body; who hath thy strength? God, or thy lusts? (I:144)
  35. When Satan finds the good man asleep, then he finds our good God awake; therefore thou art not consumed, because he changeth not. (I:146)
  36. Bid faith look through the key-hole of the promise, and tell thee what it sees there laid up for him that overcomes; bid it listen and tell thee whether it cannot hear the shout of those crowned saints, as of those that are dividing the spoil, and receiving the reward of all their services and sufferings here on earth. (I:150)
  37. Christ counts it his honour, that he is a king of a willing people, and not of slaves. (I:155)
  38. All his commands are acts of grace, it is a favour to be employed about them. (I:155)
  39. How can God stoop lower than to come and dwell with a poor humble soul? which is more than if he had said, such a one should dwell with him; for a beggar to live at court is not so much as the king to dwell with him in his cottage. (I:161)
  40. O if once our hearts were but filled with zeal for God, and compassion to our people's souls, we would up and be doing, though we could but lay a brick a day, and God would be with us. (I:167)
  41. And when God comes to reckon with his workmen, the ploughman and the sower shall have his penny, as well as the harvest-man and the reaper. (I:167)

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